[Epub] ➟ Bombay Stories ➠ Saadat Hasan Manto – Snackgo.co.uk

Bombay Stories All short stories are autobiographical, these stories kind of a reminds me of short stories written by Charles Bukowski which are written from the point of view of Henri Chinaski, Bukowski s alter ego The writing in this book has an astonishing spontaneous feel to it, anything can and will happen in the raw inventive hands of Manto Bombay Stories is a collection of Manto s fiction where short stories are set in part or entirely in the Mumbai city, and every story has a unique sense of place emerges through the narratives by bringing attention to his authorial consciousness where Manto attracts our attention briefly on exactly what he feels and focuses on what he pretends to dismiss or belittle In one of the stories Manto confesses that he made everything up in his story and in the same story there is a character Naim who writes to Manto at the story s end to confess that he made everything up, and yet his stories felt true and that through his lies he expressed a real part of himself I didn t know If Manto has lived those moments and meet those interesting characters which are described in the book but he has made me feel like that he was the very part of it His self conscious reflections on Firstly, my sincere apologies to all Manto fans for the following review This book was bad just plain bad I have never struggled so much to finish any book before this one I really don t know where to even big I have no idea why is this book called Bombay Stories There was nothing Bombay about any of the stories Most of the them were so similar and repetative in theme, all about pimps, prostitutes, struggling actors and directors, pathetic parties and aimless drinking Agreed that these elements are a part of any metropolitan city but there was nothing really bombay about it This book has miserably failed to bring out even the slightest essence of the city the writing or the translation, most probably was so bland and basic, it seems someone just jotted down the stories for the sake of finishing a book I really hate giving one star to any book and I try my best to give it the most stars but this one was just bad I would not recommend this book to anyone, especially those wanting to get Rating 3.5 starsA collection of 15 short stories set in pre independence Bombay, featuring prostitutes, pimps, writers, thugs, and the like Written in simple prose at least if you go by the translation , the stories are by turns delightful, moving, and occasionally, a little mediocre They also manage to be both frank and subtle, which is an excellent achievement.The appendix of the book has three non fiction pieces by Manto, which help us understand about him.On society and prostitutes, in Women and the Film World Society produces prostitutes, and its wide reaching laws foster their existence So why are they stigmatized, why is their collective death wished, when they too are part of society If we want to transform them into something good, then we will have to work to improve society as a whole As long as we don t think with new vigor about how our society operates, then in this so called era of culture and civilization there will continue to be prostitutes everywhere and this impurity will never disappear.On gender bias in the way society views men and women, also in the same piece Our so called honorable citizens hold fundamentally flawed opinions about prostitutes in that their posturing is essentially no than I m always taken by a bit of surprise when Manto turns out to be the narrator of his own stories I don t mean that he s writing the story for us, I mean when he up and directly inserts himself into the story which isn t really breaking a fourth wall so much as letting us peek into his diary To sum it up, his diary is rife with accounts of his crazy ass friends and street women They go out and do some pimpin and drinkin , and then on his worst days tragedy will strike I think Manto s storytelling is easy and lightweight, which makes for a favourable read I am, however, a little hard on content Manto will bring you to some interesting places, for sure the best thing about non English writers is when they give you insight on where they live, of their culture, how people are different and what histories lie in the setting so yeah, Manto will take you to When Hamid dropped Lata off at her house at nine that night, he felt hollow The touch of her soft body was sheared from him like bark from a tree, and he spent the entire night tossing and turning.In the course of finding a prostitute for a client, Hamid becomes infatuated with the fresh Lata and spends thousands of rupees on her, taken from his bank account without the knowledge of his wife Moral disintegration follows Early in the story Manto contrasts meticulous Hamid with the well to do client Babu Har Gopal, who seems indifferent to filth in others or himself He ate off dirty plates and was unfazed His pillowcase was soiled and stank, but he never thought of changing it Hamid thought long and hard, but he couldn t understand him He often asked, Babuji, why aren t you revolted by dirtiness Babu Har Gopal would smile I am revolted But when you re obsessed by it, you see it everywhere How can you cure yourself of that Hamid had no answer but his disgust didn t abate.Manto was obsessed by the colorful life of Bombay immigrants scrabbling to live on the edge He sees it everywhere He writes about prostitutes, gangsters, and every kind of hanger on in the film industry The stories are matter of fact characters generally Further amused by Manto s artistry Brewed in the cheap alleys of pre independent Bombay, amidst the low lives and the pleasure seekers and the wanna bes, these stories pick up the commonplace, the everyday, and make it shine like embers His effortlessness is envious. I honestly think this book just suffered a lot from its translation As I was reading it I could literally feel how much context I was missing out on because it wasn t translated well A lot of meaning and symbolism is lost once a work has been translated and I m quite a big fan of the way penguin pocket classics format their translated fiction, so for example in those editions if a phrase, name, or a word is mentioned that needs further explanation for the reader to truly understand its importance they add an asterisk and give the background information necessary in the footnote on the page It s simple to follow and helps a lot with understanding the book I think if Vintage had a similar format to that of Penguin s this would have been far enjoyable There was a point in the book that just annoyed me so there s a line that says I don t know what his real name was but everyone called him Dhundhu, which was fitting because his job was to find girls that satisfied his customers varied tastes But the thing is I don t know why that s fitting because I don t know what that word means to begin with That s why I feel like I wasn t getting as much as I could have from this collection unfortunately.The writing was really bland nothing was driving the stories, if this were to have been one story rather than a collection of short stories I m not sure I woul How I love Manto, and how obscure I have been about his writing all these days Pity me, but not any I have read multiple books on Indian History, Indian freedom struggle, set during 1930 s This particular book too is set round about the same time and it covers quite a lot of ground as it chugs along covering topics other than the freedom struggle.How the author has portrayed his stay in Mumbai during the pre independence era, what occupation the people were into, a glimpse into the film industry during the 1930 s, it has left me with no other option that to order few books of Manto as well as Bombay and start reading them too So many people get introduced in this book and each one has a different tale to tell Its a great work, the translation might have taken off some luster but overall its a gem worth taking some time out and reading That s my perspective though, I hope you agree I could literally visualize an era, where the population was less, technology was not that advanced, life was laid back, where a journey from Lahore to Bombay could be taken by a train, plus an age where letters, telegrams and occasional roaring of an engine, still held a charm How I wish I could have heard such stories from my grand parents Never mind, but with Manto s stories for company, I am sure, I can fill that void and instead come c Manto is able to conjure beauty from the drudgery of Bombay the dirt filled puddles reflect the diaphanous sun light of a gleaming Bombay morning, as the cast of outcasts who populate these short stories pimps and prostitutes, artists and assassins as the lugubrious and the lonesome lurch from jubilation to mourning In his unflinching portrayal of the seedy under belly of Indian life, a break from all of the cliches and caricatures which can beset stories about India and Indian society, Manto represents a truly original voice in Indian literature, at times unrefined and coarse, but with the eye of a true storyteller Mozelle stands as a particular highlight a story where the heartless floozy sacrifices herself for a insecure Sikh man who she may or may not love and his fiancee The lead character, whose casual indifference to any form of rules or decorum captivates the reader as much as it does Trilochan indeed Manto s ability to circumvent norms is his key skill s a novelist Mozelle, like so many other Manto characters, defies any kind of convention, indeed most of the female characters in his collection of short stories demonstrate this spirit of independence, this disdain for classification Manto can turn the most hardened Bombay In The 1930s And 1940s Reigned As The Undisputed Cosmopolitan Capital Of The Subcontinent Bombay Stories Is A Collection Of Manto S Work From His Years In The City Freshly Arrived In 1930s Mumbai, Manto Saw A City Like No Other An Exhilarating Hub Of License And Liberty, And A City Bursting With Both Creative Energy And Helpless Despondency It Was To Be Manto S Favourite City, And He Was Among The First To Write The Bombay Characters We Are Now Familiar With From Countless Stories And Films Prostitutes, Pimps, Lowlifes, Writers, Intellectuals, Aspiring Film Actors, Thugs, Conmen And Crooks His Hard Edged, Moving Stories Remain, A Hundred Years After His Birth, Startling And Provocative In Searching Out Those Forgotten By Humanity, Manto Wrote About What It Means To Be Human Matt Reeck And Aftab Ahmad S Translations Reach Into The Streets And Capture In Contemporary, Idiomatic English The Feeling That Urdu S Most Celebrated Short Story Writer S Work Stories Provide In The Original.

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