Le Balcon PDF í Mass Market Paperback

Le Balcon This is one of the most puzzling plays I ve read At one level it is quite obvious with clear symbols of different parts of the state and the interplay of illusion with reality On another level however, the interactions between these aspects gets murky and pivotal parts of the play are ambiguous in its implications The result is a play that really makes you think and question whether you understood what you thought you understood After finding nothing interesting in Genet s Funeral Rites I wa This is one of the most puzzling plays I ve read At one level it is quite obvious with clear symbols of different parts of the state and the interplay of illusion with reality On another level however, the interactions between these aspects gets murky and pivotal parts of the play are ambiguous in its implications The result is a play that really makes you think and question whether you understood what you thought you understood After finding nothing interesting in Genet s Funeral Rites I was quite glad to find something admirable by this greatly revered author I would definitely recommend it to anyone who has enjoyed a unique theater experience Jean Genet s controversial play The Balcony takes place within a house of illusions where men dress up as bishops, generals, judges, and even the indigent to play out bizarre sexual fantasies while a revolution takes place throughout the surrounding city It retains the nonspecific time and location of other absurdist plays but adds a meta theatrical flamboyance It s as if Genet tossed sex, religion, Marxism, psychoanalysis, reality, and illusion in a blender together and this is the concocti Jean Genet s controversial play The Balcony takes place within a house of illusions where men dress up as bishops, generals, judges, and even the indigent to play out bizarre sexual fantasies while a revolution takes place throughout the surrounding city It retains the nonspecific time and location of other absurdist plays but adds a meta theatrical flamboyance It s as if Genet tossed sex, religion, Marxism, psychoanalysis, reality, and illusion in a blender together and this is the concoction that emerged.All of these elements continually slide around and meld together in different ways Parallels are drawn between sex and revolution and the illusions of both common and powerful men Parallels are probably drawn between sex and just about everything else here, really The most noticeable aspect of the play is the ubiquity of performance Not only do the men who come to the brothel pretend to be in positions of power, it seems that according to Genet, the actual people in power are pretending every bit as much Their alleged power only comes from the heightened sense of importance they have instilled in themselves through frivolous measures There is no clear distinction between any of these people purportedly great or small The prince and the pauper are the same person.However, if Genet denigrates authority figures, he s not much kinder to the lower strata Revolutionaries are not so much out to create social change but revel in chaos and debauchery while those who obsequiously follow the orders of the higher ups have basically become slaves to actors pretending they are in charge.As odd a mix as this all might sound, it does somehow seem to work Even if it s not always clear what s going on the last act became particularly confusing there is a morbid exuberance that impels readers viewers forward not only to see how far this eccentric play can push the boundaries but also to force them to make sense of the events and find where their own performance fits into this brothel of a world This book is a work of dramatic genius Genet poses for us the question, What is the nature of virtue and its relationship with power In his setting, he chooses a brothel, with the actors in the brothel trapped in a never ending cycle of violent fiction that mirrors the events of the revolution happening outside the brothel walls.The are great, witty lines such as The pimp has a grin, never a smile There are great, beautiful lines such as It s the hour when night breaks away from the day, This book is a work of dramatic genius Genet poses for us the question, What is the nature of virtue and its relationship with power In his setting, he chooses a brothel, with the actors in the brothel trapped in a never ending cycle of violent fiction that mirrors the events of the revolution happening outside the brothel walls.The are great, witty lines such as The pimp has a grin, never a smile There are great, beautiful lines such as It s the hour when night breaks away from the day, my dove, let me go There are poignant lines such as It s a true image, born of a false spectacle Lines such as these bring us back to the questions of the play.You could go on and on asking questions about this play a true mark of its genius Genet cleverly connects the outside world with the inside reality when he has the madame state One can hear all that s going on in the street Which means that from the street one can hear what s going on in the house The men inside, exacting their devilish fantasies, are in some cases the actual power figures of the city Their inability to hold both power and virtue is not, I don t think, meant to be an indictment Rather, it is meant to point to the reality that the powerful exist without virtue Genet returns us to that reality with his closing lines You must now go home, where everything you can be quite sure will be falser than here HmmI really like what Genet was trying to do here, but I m not sure that it is pulled off as well as it could have been This play is very much postmodern, and in that sense it reminded me a lot of Pynchon s Gravity s Rainbow in terms of style and themes Like Genet and also like the Frankfurt School sociologists, with their emphasis on Freud s death instinct Eros v Thanatos and the Marquis de Sade, with whom Genet is often compared , Pynchon also equated the appetite for power with sad HmmI really like what Genet was trying to do here, but I m not sure that it is pulled off as well as it could have been This play is very much postmodern, and in that sense it reminded me a lot of Pynchon s Gravity s Rainbow in terms of style and themes Like Genet and also like the Frankfurt School sociologists, with their emphasis on Freud s death instinct Eros v Thanatos and the Marquis de Sade, with whom Genet is often compared , Pynchon also equated the appetite for power with sado masochism and ultimately the love of power is linked not only to sexual depravity but to a love of Death In Genet s play the main action takes place in a brothel in which the players are really putting on a performance, each taking on a role equated with power in society Each power figure appears in the play, according to the scene notes, as larger than life , while a revolution is going on outside the brothel walls Each player acts out his role accordingly the Bishop demands that one sins so that he can offer forgiveness, the Judge demands that one breaks the law so he can hand down a sentence, the Executioner carries out the judge s sentences And the same goes for the General, the Chief of Police, etc each playing his part In terms of style, Genet with this play in particular has also often been compared to Bertolt Brecht And this is certainly understandable, as there are many stylistic similarities and as Genet, like Brecht, is concerned here with critically exploring broad social problems, representing them not realistically, but as some representation thereof, something that Genet makes plain throughout as his characters often refer to themselves as wearing masks, as being statues, images, etc And the play also reminded mein its thematic content but also to some degree stylistically of Luis Bu uel s Belle de Jour And, of course, the work was also redolent of the brothel scenes in later volumes of Proust s In Search of Lost Time In all, stylistically what Genet was doing here had been done before and thematically there was also a precedent, and other artists have since dealt with similar style and themessuccessfully I always think when reading a translated work that perhaps my lack of enthusiasm or alternatively my love for the work is owedto the translation than to the work itself And this may well be the case This is the first work of Genet s that I ve read, and I think I will at least read his debut novel, Our Lady of the Flowers, before reaching any conclusions about Genet s work overall And my opinions of that work will likely determine whether or not I d be interested in reading anyGenet thereafter At this point I m just not sold The action of this play takes place inside a brothel while a revolution goes on outside The brothel caters to fancies The johns can choose to dress as whatever power figure they choose to be The police chief in the course of the play watches clients dress as a judge, a bishop and a general Finally, the insurrection is crushed and the leader of the rebels enters the brothel asking to dress up as a police chief At last says the police chief, they have seen the truth I think Genet has writ The action of this play takes place inside a brothel while a revolution goes on outside The brothel caters to fancies The johns can choose to dress as whatever power figure they choose to be The police chief in the course of the play watches clients dress as a judge, a bishop and a general Finally, the insurrection is crushed and the leader of the rebels enters the brothel asking to dress up as a police chief At last says the police chief, they have seen the truth I think Genet has written one of the greatest jokes of the twentieth century Police states are becoming the norm and so it is time that our sexual fantasies adapt Throughout the play, the different characters utter great one liners at a rapid pace Unfortunately,the plot has nocomplexity than is in my summary and the characters amongst the most superficials you will ever see.This play is a work of its time It shows the persistent tendency of the French to offer superficial and self righteous interpretations of current events Mind blowing Everyone should at least be aware of what Genet accomplished here He was way ahead of his time. I lost count of how many times I have read this play, further I have watched it being rehearsed over and over and performed three times, still I am quite sure I do not understand what is going on I can t tell reality from fantasy, I don t understand who has power and who s faking, or even if anyone actually has power or is faking Every time I read it, there s something new to it, but I feel like I haven t read it enough times, it still puzzles me, I can t think straight This play is rich I lost count of how many times I have read this play, further I have watched it being rehearsed over and over and performed three times, still I am quite sure I do not understand what is going on I can t tell reality from fantasy, I don t understand who has power and who s faking, or even if anyone actually has power or is faking Every time I read it, there s something new to it, but I feel like I haven t read it enough times, it still puzzles me, I can t think straight This play is rich for many reasons, but the biggest one for me is how challenging it is to process it The Balcony is aa play that explores the relationship between realism and fantasy The setting, a brothel where the clientele pays to live in a very realistic version of their fantasies But when the outside world or the real starts to seep in, the clients have a hard time separating fact from fiction and start to lose themselves as they get lost in their roles The Balcony by Jean Genet relies quite heavily on the concept of icons and symbols Powerful men come to Irma s brothel to embody the The Balcony is aa play that explores the relationship between realism and fantasy The setting, a brothel where the clientele pays to live in a very realistic version of their fantasies But when the outside world or the real starts to seep in, the clients have a hard time separating fact from fiction and start to lose themselves as they get lost in their roles The Balcony by Jean Genet relies quite heavily on the concept of icons and symbols Powerful men come to Irma s brothel to embody these symbols of society such as the bishop, the judge, andThey request the experience be as realistic as possible so they can embody that character, literally become it themselves.Through this, I believe Genet is trying to say, literally anybody can become a symbol Fantasy and reality are so closely intertwined that it truly only takes the right outfit and choice words to convince the world you are someone else Would it perturb you to see things as they are To gaze at the world tranquilly and accept responsibility for your gaze, whatever it might see I found this less Brecht andPassolini Revolution became chic at some point This is about assuming roles in tumultuous times I found the endearing aspect to be the role of the siren or chanteuse The pimp has a grin, never a smileMuch as Steven Godin asserted on GR today I think the experience would have been enhanced by viewing this staged I don Would it perturb you to see things as they are To gaze at the world tranquilly and accept responsibility for your gaze, whatever it might see I found this less Brecht andPassolini Revolution became chic at some point This is about assuming roles in tumultuous times I found the endearing aspect to be the role of the siren or chanteuse The pimp has a grin, never a smileMuch as Steven Godin asserted on GR today I think the experience would have been enhanced by viewing this staged I don t feel that when I read Brecht or Beckett Le balcon est un bordel de luxe o plusieurs personnages viennent assouvir leurs fantasmes, sadomasochistes en apparence, mais philosophiques en r alit Sous la com die rotique, se cache une r flexion sur la mort


About the Author: Jean Genet

Jean Genet 1910 1986 , poet, novelist, playwright, and political essayist, was one of the most significant French writers of the twentieth century His work, much of it considered scandalous when it first appeared, is now placed among the classics of modern literature and has been translated and performed throughout the world.


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