Walking the Himalayas ePUB ã Walking the PDF/EPUB ²

Levison Wood has become my favorite adventure travel writer Walking the Himalayas follows Lev in his arduous six month journey from Afghanistan to Kashmir to Nepal There are natural disasters There is conflict There is a dangerous crash There is also incredible beauty and innumerable acts of human kindness There s even a meeting with the Dalai Lama This is the third book of Levison s I ve read the others are Walking the Nile and Walking the Americas and I hope he continues to go on Levison Wood has become my favorite adventure travel writer Walking the Himalayas follows Lev in his arduous six month journey from Afghanistan to Kashmir to Nepal There are natural disasters There is conflict There is a dangerous crash There is also incredible beauty and innumerable acts of human kindness There s even a meeting with the Dalai Lama This is the third book of Levison s I ve read the others are Walking the Nile and Walking the Americas and I hope he continues to go on these incredible journeys for as long as he can Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys a thrilling travelogue.Favorite Passages I decided that the aims of this expedition wouldn t be to climb mountains, or to try to break any records, or even to attempt to cover as much ground as possible, but instead use this opportunity to explore, on foot, the valleys and foothills that were inhabited by the various communities and tribes that called the Himalayas their home For me it was about the people I encountered that attracted me to travel, and travelling on foot is the only way to explore the backcountry and villages that are hidden from the main trails and roads It is also the way people have travelled in these regions for millennia and there seems to be a common bond between pedestrians everywhere The physical hardships, the risks, the utter vulnerability mean that on the whole you will be looked upon as a fellow human being, rather than a foreigner, or worse, a tourist But where there is darkness, I d also found light Years of travelling out of uniform in war zones had taught me a few lessons So long as you re not armed and come in peace, you re willing to adopt to local customs with sensitivity to culture and tradition and try not to judge too much however tempting you ll generally be fine People in the most dangerous parts of the world had gone out of their way to make me feel at home, sometimes regardless of whether I d wanted to or not With a smattering of language, a spot of homework, a bit of fancy dress and knowing when it s wise to grow a beard or not , I d somehow managed to blend in, survive, and what s , make some good friends along the way I really enjoy arm chair travel expected to enjoy thisthan I did The author was a bit self absorbed Could have used a bitself deprecation, or humor, or interest in the life going on around him The story of his journeys was, fundamentally, all about him withoutinquiry, insight or learning about the culture, people history which makes the travel booksmeaningful to me I really enjoy arm chair travel expected to enjoy thisthan I did The author was a bit self absorbed Could have used a bitself deprecation, or humor, or interest in the life going on around him The story of his journeys was, fundamentally, all about him withoutinquiry, insight or learning about the culture, people history which makes the travel booksmeaningful to me I disliked this book so much that when searching for other 1 2 star ratings and finding just a few I started to doubt my skill as a reader But alas, I m holding strong with the one star.I had reasonable expectations to like this, I mean it has travel, adventure, nature all things that are most enjoyable But no, it just doesn t work His characterizations of people are inane, and rather simplistic It s like he expected to write certain experiences and meet certain kinds of people, and so the I disliked this book so much that when searching for other 1 2 star ratings and finding just a few I started to doubt my skill as a reader But alas, I m holding strong with the one star.I had reasonable expectations to like this, I mean it has travel, adventure, nature all things that are most enjoyable But no, it just doesn t work His characterizations of people are inane, and rather simplistic It s like he expected to write certain experiences and meet certain kinds of people, and so the narrative formed to that instead of the other way around I d include an excerpt or two as an example but the ebook has already been returned to the library Maybe if I had seen the television series I d have beeninvolved and attuned with him as a narrator And I never rely on the movie show to carry the book That is sacrilege.What really made this a 1 star instead of a 2 star is his writing Like, it felt like a high schooler writing a creative essay for a school assignment or something His descriptions are dull and uninventive It took the pleasure out of reading Maybe this seems harsh but I can t stress how bored I was while reading this I would ve DNF d it but I was on a long train ride and it was the only book I had downloaded besides poetry I haven t got phone data After a long introduction where Wood tells how he was settling in after the Nile adventure and how he got inspired for onewalk, he gives the highlights of this trek They are great But, really, a 6 month trip, 200 pages This, and his lack of sympathy for his guides the river crossing with Malang Darya and in Binod Pariyar s foot problems is why I m giving this 5 star book a 4 star rating.It could be that the highlights, which he relates, are so high that all else pales He nearly died, After a long introduction where Wood tells how he was settling in after the Nile adventure and how he got inspired for onewalk, he gives the highlights of this trek They are great But, really, a 6 month trip, 200 pages This, and his lack of sympathy for his guides the river crossing with Malang Darya and in Binod Pariyar s foot problems is why I m giving this 5 star book a 4 star rating.It could be that the highlights, which he relates, are so high that all else pales He nearly died, at least 3 times exposure, car accident, snake and perhaps others There are marvelous episodes, seeing a buzkashi in remote Afghanistan, a shaman, nomad tribes, having a special meeting with the Dali Lama, a trek on the bee hunting trip, crossing into Bhutan andLike the Nile book, the pictures are wonderful, each begging for placement in a coffee table sized book Also like the Nile trip, the serendipitous way he is found by friends in this case a friend and a brother suspends belief.Most books and general media focus on the peaks It s good to see some attention to life in the foothills.Even if the rest of the trip was dull compared with this, I d like to have readWhile I got this book from the library, I still feel a little cheated Following his trek along the length of the Nile River, explorer Levison Wood takes on his greatest challenge yet navigating the treacherous foothills of the Himalayas, the world s highest mountain range Praised by Bear Grylls, Levison Wood has been called the toughest man on TV The Times UK Now, following in the footsteps of the great explorers, Levison recounts the beauty and danger he found along the Silk Road route of Afghanistan, the Line of Control between Pakistan and India, the disputed territories of Kashmir and the earth quake ravaged lands of Nepal Over the course of six months, Wood and his trusted guides trek , gruelling miles across the roof of the worldPacked with action and emotion, Walking the Himalayas is the story of one intrepid man s travels in a world poised on the edge of tremendous change I wanted to read this after seeing the author speak, and being so taken with his story Though I rarely read non fiction, this read so well and smoothly, I might find myself picking up titles in the genreoften I loved the way Wood described his journey and the people he encountered, and also that he didn t glorify danger or pretend this is something everyone should do It was simply a totally satisfying way for me to be an armchair explorer and I can t wait to read about his other long jo I wanted to read this after seeing the author speak, and being so taken with his story Though I rarely read non fiction, this read so well and smoothly, I might find myself picking up titles in the genreoften I loved the way Wood described his journey and the people he encountered, and also that he didn t glorify danger or pretend this is something everyone should do It was simply a totally satisfying way for me to be an armchair explorer and I can t wait to read about his other long journey walking the length of the Nile Highly recommended Findreviews and bookish fun at Just like Levison Wood s other works,this is a well written travelogue.Its also a major television series but the book is also a goodread.It is a perfect book for all people who want to know about Himalayan People and their lives. Levinson Wood has quickly established himself as one of the very best adventure writers I wish I had read Himalayas first rather than last in Wood s Walking trilogy Wood waits until this second book to tell his origin story, which also helped me understand whythan half of my adventure books are by Brits Himalayas is his most compelling story, not because he has his closest brush with death, but because of the friendships he forms I give him bonus points for risking having his boo Levinson Wood has quickly established himself as one of the very best adventure writers I wish I had read Himalayas first rather than last in Wood s Walking trilogy Wood waits until this second book to tell his origin story, which also helped me understand whythan half of my adventure books are by Brits Himalayas is his most compelling story, not because he has his closest brush with death, but because of the friendships he forms I give him bonus points for risking having his book banned in China and India due to his sympathies for Tibet and Kashmir.His books do not make this clear, but Wikipedia indicates that Wood remains a British paratrooper, having recently risen to the rank of major Wood has great admiration for Victorian England s explorers and colonizers He is often retracing their steps or seeking evidence of their settlement From the very beginning, Wood notes that Rudyard Kipling lived in one of the buildings where he decides to undertake his Himalayan trek Wood never really explains in geographical or historical terms why he begins his trek in the extreme northeastern corner of Afghanistan, other than that he had served in that war torn country It does make for a hair raising start to his journey Even though he doesn t start walking until a quarter of the way into the book, Himalayas does not feel rushed like Walking the Americas He is also making his second and third visits to most of the countries he walks through, which gives him a deeper understanding of the cultures he encounters.As with his Nile trek, Wood is forced to skip a small section in this case just two miles because of conflict He had to then take a detour of hundreds of miles by bus due to the disputed border between India and Pakistan Wood explains that the U.K created the festering Kashmir conflict by installing Hindu rulers in a predominantly Muslim region, but fails to mention that the U.K also bears considerable responsibility for the up to two million deaths that occurred as a result of an overly hasty withdrawal from the Indian Subcontinent Ironically, Wood faces the greatest peril of his three journeys not at the hands of mother nature, an apex predator or disease, but during one his rare trips in a car His pictures support his vivid account of how horrific the accident proved to be all to travel a distance of five miles For someone professing not to be religious, it is almost as ironic that the heart of Wood s Himalayan experience is a series of meetings with religious leaders, culminating with an audience with the Dalai Lama Meanwhile, the emotional heart of the book is Wood s reunion with the Nepali friend he made as a 19 year old gap year backpacker.Easily the most curious person Wood befriends comes near the end of his 1500 mile journey in the form of his cross dressing gangster guide for Bhutan When asked why there are so many phallic symbols, Jamyang responds, We worship dicks All these phalluses keep away evil spirits When they talk about all the hikers dying on Mt Everest, Jamyang tells Wood, You Westerners, we have no idea why you want to climb mountains It s just stupid, don t you think You just want to conquer things, plant flags and all that p 262 This does not stop Wood from raising the Union Jack in the final picture when he reaches the endpoint of his journey Wood has inspired me to return to South Asia and retrace some of his footsteps I think I ll skip Afghanistan So what comes next adventure reading wise If I stay in this part of the world I have narrowed my choices to three books I seem to have a thing for triplets I have been meaning to read Rory Stewart s The Places In Between, which covers the parts of Afghanistan that were too dangerous for Wood to walk Stewart recently came up short to be the U.K s prime minister I also want to read Michael Benanav s Himalaya Bound His south to north route intersects with Wood s west to east route near the Ganges It is hard to tell with such small images in both books, but Benanav seems to be a better photographer than Wood My final option is Ian Baker s The Heart of the World, which explores the one place Wood was not allowed to visit Tibet What a shame this spectacular Top of the World has so much unrest and conflict As if walking the entire length of the Nile was not mad enough, his good friend Ashwin Bhardwaj persuades him to walk along the rooftop of the world the Himalayas Wood had been to Nepal before way back in 2001, when the country s Royal family was massacred At that time a man called Binod took him in and protected him whilst the unrest continued This new walk along the world s highest mountain range meant that he had the opportunity to return and see him once again.Flying into Kabul would be As if walking the entire length of the Nile was not mad enough, his good friend Ashwin Bhardwaj persuades him to walk along the rooftop of the world the Himalayas Wood had been to Nepal before way back in 2001, when the country s Royal family was massacred At that time a man called Binod took him in and protected him whilst the unrest continued This new walk along the world s highest mountain range meant that he had the opportunity to return and see him once again.Flying into Kabul would be adventure enough for some people, but that was where he needed to get to, to be able to reach the eastern foothills The last time Wood had been there he was in the army Met by his minder at the airport, he is taken to the scruffy looking car to make the first part of his journey, before a helicopter ride to the start point Wakhan Corridor He is accompanied along the walk by guides, even persuading Ashwin to join him for one section, before he makes it to Nepal for a reunion with his friend, Binod, before continuing his journey to Gankhar Puensum in Bhutan.Wood is one tough guy not only is this a mammoth walk of 1700 miles, but he does this at altitude too no mean feat He is an easy going character, meaning that as he meets some of the toughest and nicest people he fits in easily, drawing their stories and lives out into the narrative The range of cultures is quite an eye opener too, from the strict Islamic areas to therelaxed and laid back Nepalese It is reasonably well written, gripping in parts and has one heart stopping moment Haven t seen the TV series yet, but I m looking forward to watching it soon This is the tale of Levison Wood six months, 2,736 km, four million steps, a handful of guides and one man walking Wood recounts the beauty and danger along the Silk Road route of Afghanistan, the Line of Control between Pakistan and India, the disputed territories of Kashmir, the earthquake ravaged lands of Nepal and the phallus worshipping happiness of BhutanThis review was first published for The Hans IndiaRaw, rugged and realPacked with action and emotion, Walking the Himalayas is the sto This is the tale of Levison Wood six months, 2,736 km, four million steps, a handful of guides and one man walking Wood recounts the beauty and danger along the Silk Road route of Afghanistan, the Line of Control between Pakistan and India, the disputed territories of Kashmir, the earthquake ravaged lands of Nepal and the phallus worshipping happiness of BhutanThis review was first published for The Hans IndiaRaw, rugged and realPacked with action and emotion, Walking the Himalayas is the story of explorer Levison Wood s trek from the western anchor of the Himalayas in Afghanistan to the eastern anchor of the magnificent mountains in Bhutan, traversing through Pakistan, India and Nepal.Not to be humbled by the magnitude and dangers of the travel it is after all, walking the length of the Himalayan ranges but, the book does stand out with its breath taking narration, dramatic writing style that leaves a reader gasping forand the spiritual abundance Wood encounters across many faiths in his journey Over the course of six months, Levison Wood and his trusted guides, Malang, Binod and others trek 2,736 gruelling kilometres across the roof of the world the book gives a realistic impression of a journey often endured rather than enjoyed what with the stories of simple families and their everyday lives The beauty in narration lies as to how Wood manages to strike a balance in sharing the magnitude of his own travel story while continuously giving equal if notrepresentation to the stories of people he met en route It begins in the dusty perennial battlefields in Afghanistan with the Hindu Kush where if nature was kind, abundance of national and foreign military presence is not As he steps into Pakistan with the Karakorum in the backdrop, the terror filled valleys, liberal Muslims of rural areas and the Line of Control LoC between Pakistan and India speak abundance of the country s ground reality Wood and his guide, Binod, battle the avalanche of landslides in the snow capped Kashmir ranges face the fury of nature in the monsoons of Nepal, which drowned their spirits and involved a near fatal accident in the region the mighty Everest giving a sight to behold camping in the dangerous jungle with tigers and wild elephants that gave them cheerful visits during the night and finally reaching the virgin ranges in Bhutan every page is magnificently narrated it is as if the reader travels with the author.As Wood explains before his travel, the journey was not about climbing mountain peaks but, to walk the length of the Himalayas and live the many lives of the people the majestic mountains contain amidst the political unrest in all countriesSpiritual abundance Another major standout point is the spiritual abundance across the world s roof From the non fasting Ismaili Muslims in Afghanistan to the khol eyed Muslims practicing the Ramadan fest in Pakistan the serenity of Tibetan Monks in Dharmasala and meeting His Holiness, the Dalai Lama the orange swarm of swamis in Rishikesh and the lone Aghori baba the honey capturers in Nepal and the penis worshipping, happiness measuring people of Bhutan Wood learned not to challenge faiths and accept spirituality at all levels.Each spiritual story across varied religions, including the superstitions, is a reminder of the power of faith And, for the scale of traveller he is, Wood s ultimate learning and realisation from the entire journey is a pleasant surprise for the readers because it is simple and well known yet, its understanding is profound and philosophically magnificent.The brave traveller and his phenomenally inspiring tale is an emotional roller coaster, which at the end will leave you smiling for his success and achievement especially at the peaceful calm atop the Snow Leopard Mountain, which he so named The trek has been documented as a TV series for Sure, watch it but read the book because it is so much Walking the Himalayas


About the Author: Levison Wood

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Walking the Himalayas book, this is one of the most wanted Levison Wood author readers around the world.


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