[Epub] ❧ The Essential Rumi By Rumi – Snackgo.co.uk

The Essential Rumi This Revised And Expanded Edition Of The Essential Rumi Includes A New Introduction By Coleman Barks And Than 80 Never Before Published Poems.Through His Lyrical Translations, Coleman Barks Has Been Instrumental In Bringing This Exquisite Literature To A Remarkably Wide Range Of Readers, Making The Ecstatic, Spiritual Poetry Of Thirteenth Century Sufi Mystic Rumi Popular Than Ever.The Essential Rumi Continues To Be The Bestselling Of All Rumi Books, And The Definitive Selection Of His Beautiful, Mystical Poetry.


About the Author: Rumi

Jal l ad D n Muhammad R m also known as Jal l ad D n Muhammad Balkh , Mevl n Mawl n , our master , Mevlev Mawlaw , my master andpopularly simply as Rumi was a 13th century Persian poet, jurist, Islamic scholar, theologian and Sufi mystic who lived in Konya, a city of Ottoman Empire Today s Turkey His poems have been widely translated into many of the world s lang Jal l ad D n Muhammad R m also known as Jal l ad D n Muhammad Balkh , Mevl n Mawl n , our master , Mevlev Mawlaw , my master andpopularly simply as Rumi was a 13th century Persian poet, jurist, Islamic scholar, theologian and Sufi mystic who lived in Konya, a city of Ottoman Empire Today s Turkey His poems have been widely translated into many of the world s languages, and he has been described as the most popular poet and the best selling poet in the United States.His poetry has influenced Persian literature, but also Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Azerbaijani, Punjabi, Hindi, and Urdu, as well as the literature of some other Turkic, Iranian, and Indo Aryan languages including Chagatai, Pashto, and Bengali.Due to quarrels between different dynasties in Khor n, opposition to the Khwarizmid Shahs who were considered devious by his father, Bah ud D n W lad or fear of the impending Mongol cataclysm, his father decided to migrate westwards, eventually settling in the Anatolian city Konya, where he lived most of his life, composed one of the crowning glories of Persian literature, and profoundly affected the culture of the area.When his father died, Rumi, aged 25, inherited his position as the head of an Islamic school One of Baha ud Din s students, Sayyed Burhan ud Din Muhaqqiq Termazi, continued to train Rumi in the Shariah as well as the Tariqa, especially that of Rumi s father For nine years, Rumi practised Sufism as a disciple of Burhan ud Din until the latter died in 1240 or 1241 Rumi s public life then began he became an Islamic Jurist, issuing fatwas and giving sermons in the mosques of Konya He also served as a Molvi Islamic teacher and taught his adherents in the madrassa During this period, Rumi also travelled to Damascus and is said to have spent four years there.It was his meeting with the dervish Shams e Tabrizi on 15 November 1244 that completely changed his life From an accomplished teacher and jurist, Rumi was transformed into an ascetic.On the night of 5 December 1248, as Rumi and Shams were talking, Shams was called to the back door He went out, never to be seen again Rumi s love for, and his bereavement at the death of, Shams found their expression in an outpouring of lyric poems, Divan e Shams e Tabrizi He himself went out searching for Shams and journeyed again to Damascus.Rumi found another companion in Sala ud Din e Zarkub, a goldsmith After Salah ud Din s death, Rumi s scribe and favourite student, Hussam e Chalabi, assumed the role of Rumi s companion Hussam implored Rumi to writeRumi spent the next 12 years of his life in Anatolia dictating the six volumes of this masterwork, the Masnavi, to Hussam.In December 1273, Rumi fell ill and died on the 17th of December in Konya



10 thoughts on “The Essential Rumi

  1. says:

    I keep a copy of the Essential Rumi trans Coleman Barks with me, everywhere I go My copy, given to me in 2001, has travelled the world with me I read a poem a day, although sometimes it s a poem every other day I discovered Rumi through a great book given to me by my mother The Language of Life, a Companion Book to the Bill Moyers PBS special about poets alive today Coleman Barks


  2. says:

    I imagine that many will wonder why my opinion of this book is so low The answer, mainly, is that Barks is not really translating Rumi here instead he is improvising, creating his own versions of what he thinks Rumi is about, which often results in a deracinated version of Rumi s original work My own experience in talking to Iranians, and others, who know Rumi s work in the original, oft


  3. says:

    Miraculous I learn something new every time I open this book The image that sticks to mind if how we should try to emulate a reed flute and let God s breath flow through us I ve stopped being religious when I st...


  4. says:

    This is always by my bed when I haven t returned it to the library again because it gracefully and fiercely reminds me of what it means to be alive, to long for truth and love, to open my heart again and again even when the wind is blowing wickedly all around me.


  5. says:

    A phenomenal read This book of poetry by the gifted Coleman Barks has become one of my bibles of spirituality it is what I would call a one in a million read I ve added it to Thoreau s Walden and the holy boo...


  6. says:

    I don t even, I can t even dare review this It is beyond me.


  7. says:

    This place is a dream.Only a sleeper considers it real. This is a hard book for me to rate It almost seems impossible, unbearable to only reward it with three stars Parts of it gently touched my soul, and reading those few lines of pure beauty, almost felt revolutionary Rumi is mostly known for his love poems, and I can clearly see why There s a certain hint of unision and belonging in his great visions of love and he strings


  8. says:

    I am filled with you.Skin, blood, bone, brain, and soul.There s no room for lack of trust, or trust.Nothing in this existence but that existence. I have deliberately taken over 6 years to read this book I wanted to savor it like fine wine This book is an anthology of the theologian, jurist and mystic known as...


  9. says:

    This is a book I return to again and again I play a game with this book, and, I admit it sounds ridiculousI will concentrate on a problem or a situation, then open the book randomly to a page and start reading something in the poem that I selected will have some relevance to the thought at hand Of course, it has to do with my interpretation of the situation, but it always lends itself to deeper thought, or it will allow me to be able to gain


  10. says:

    When you read Rumi, a sudden mystical fog wraps you and teleports you to places unknown places where you long to go This book gives you the most basic ideas of life with subtle hints and hard hitting thoughts You might disagree with Rumi on certain points, b...


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