Mass Market Paperback ´ Kushiel's Chosen ePUB í

Kushiel's Chosen Mighty Kushiel, of rod and wealLate of the brazen portalsWith bloodtipp'd dart a wound unhealedPricks the eyen of chosen mortalsThe land of Terre d'Ange is a place of unsurpassed beauty and grace The inhabiting race rose from the seed of angels and men, and they live by one simple rule: Love as thou wiltPhèdre nó Delaunay was sold into indentured servitude as a child Her bond was purchased by a nobleman, the first to recognize that she is one pricked by Kushiel's Dart, chosen to forever experience pain and pleasure as one He trained Phèdre in the courtly arts and the talents of the bedchamber—and, above all, the ability to observe, remember, and analyzeWhen she stumbled upon a plot that threatened the very foundations of her homeland, she gave up almost everything she held dear to save it She survived, and lived to have others tell her story, and if they embellished the tale with fabric of mythical splendor, they weren't far off the markThe hands of the gods weigh heavily upon Phèdre's brow, and they are not finished with her While the young queen who sits upon the throne is well loved by the people, there are those who believe another should wear the crown and those who escaped the wrath of the mighty are not yet done with their schemes for power and revengeCover art by John Jude Palencar


10 thoughts on “Kushiel's Chosen

  1. says:

    I was waffling between 3 & 4 stars on this one, but since the second book in this series was a marked improvement for me on the first book, 4 stars it is.

    our intrepid heroine Phèdre - courtesan supreme with a very special talent for transmuting pain into pleasure - makes her debut redux as a titled Lady and


  2. says:

    *** 4.35 ***

    A Buddy Read with the FBR group!

    This second book in the Phedre Trilogy was, in my opinion, better than the first. The pacing was much better and it kept you on your toes throughout. It had some lull moments, but they were well spaced and gave the main heroine time for some angst and going


  3. says:

    With the expectations Kushiel's Dart gave me, I might have been worried that Kushiel's Chosen wouldn't match up. I wasn't, but I wouldn't have needed to be anyway. I loved this book just as much as the first one. Everything I've said about how it's not for everyone still stands (see my


  4. says:

    Perhaps some day I will read one of these BDSM courtesan-spy epic fantasy doorstops and actually be able to talk about it afterwards, but today is not that day. Because right now, I am just so fucking grateful to this book, it has eclipsed the book itself – unintentionally hilarious, strangely unproblematic – almost entire


  5. says:

    It's funny what the years can do to your taste in books - and I'm talking about something deeper, something more profound than those books that just don't stand up to being revisited. Instead, I'm talking about those books that you appreciated back in the day, but somehow knew you weren't quite ready to enjoy. Books that linger


  6. says:

    Screw magic. Give me some political fantasy any day, and I'm a happy reader.

    I liked Kushiel's Dart. I'm not sure if there's a definite quality improvement or if I'm going too easy on this one, but I loved Kushiel's Chosen.

    The Kushiel'


  7. says:

    The second in the Kushiel's legacy series, continues on exactly where the first novel left off.

    Phedre no Delaunay, now the comtesse de Montreve, comfortably living in her country home with Joscelin and her three chevaliers, and spending most of her time learning Habiru, in the hopes of discovering the key to freeing H


  8. says:

    Another beautifully written epic fantasy.

    Kushiel's Chosen picks up where Kushiel's Dart left off. But whereas Phedre is initially drawn into intrigue for the sake of her murdered mentor & foster-brother, the tragedies & travails in this second installment are a product of Phedre's own impetus. She doesn't have


  9. says:

    Kushiel's Chosen was my least favorite of Jacqueline Carey's trilogy featuring the anguisette Phedre no Delaunay. In this novel, the action shifts from Terre d'Ange to Carey's version of Venice (La Serenissima) so Phedre is free to display her snobbery and chauvinism to a grating degree (no one else is as beautiful as Angelines, no


  10. says:

    When I wrote my first review, I wondered for a while if this was really fantasy - or rather, said that up until one particular thing happened, there was nothing that made this particularly fantasy in terms of magic. I'm not sure what genre non-magical but certainly not Earth-based historical fiction would fall under.

    Note


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back To Top